Congressional Issues

Contact the United States Congress

Click here to view the list of Congressional Members by state.

*Identify Your Senators and Representatives in the U.S. Congress.
*Click the name of the elected official you want to contact. This will take you to their website.
*Look for the “Contact” link on the website, and click on it to find a web form to send your message. Send your message!

Let Your Cooperative Voice be heard by the Members of Congress that represent you!


Affordable Housing Programs Receive Increased Funding in Final FY19 Spending Deal (NLIHC)

Congress and the White House reached a final deal to fund the federal government for the remainder of FY19. In late December, President Trump and congressional leaders had failed to enact several spending bills for FY19 – including funding for affordable housing and community development programs – which led to the longest federal government shutdown in U.S. history. While leaders reached an agreement to reopen the government for three weeks, they were quickly approaching the new deadline of February 15 when congressional leaders finally reached a deal on a bipartisan spending package, including the Transportation-HUD and USDA spending bills that had previously been negotiated between the House and Senate. The Senate passed the spending package by a vote of 86-16 on February 14, and the House approved the measure on a 300-128 vote later that day. President Trump signed the bill into law on February 15.

Overall, the bill provides HUD programs with more than $12 billion above the president’s request. The spending package builds on the 10% increase in HUD funding that advocates and congressional champions secured in FY18 by providing $1.5 billion in new resources in FY19. In doing so, Congress has clearly rejected the calls to drastically cut housing investments in the form of funding cuts, harmful rent increases, rigid work requirements, or de facto time limits as proposed by the White House. For more details, see NLIHC’s updated budget chart.

Compared to FY18, the negotiated package increases funding for tenant-based rental assistance, public housing, project-based rental assistance, and homeless assistance grants. The bill also provides enough funding to renew all contracts for Section 811 Housing for Persons with Disabilities and Section 202 Housing for the Elderly. The HOME Investment Partnerships program received a slight reduction.

The spending package also includes $25 million for a mobility housing voucher demonstration for families with young children to help them move to areas of opportunity, and it provides $100 million in competitive grants to Native American communities to spur construction and preservation of affordable rental housing. The bill does not include an amendment introduced by former Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) that would have prohibited people charged with certain crimes from receiving housing assistance. NLIHC and other advocates voiced concerns about how this provision would have been implemented.

This successful outcome is due to the hard work of advocates across the nation and strong Congressional champions, including Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Jack Reed (D-RI) and Representatives David Price (D-NC) and Mario Diaz-Balart (R-FL) – the chairs and ranking members of the House and Senate Transportation-HUD Appropriations Subcommittees, as well as Senators Richard Shelby (R-AL) and Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Representatives Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Kay Granger (R-TX) – the chairs and ranking members of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees.

Project-Based Rental Housing:

The spending package provides $11.747 billion to renew Project-Based Rental Assistance contracts for the remainder of the calendar year, an increase of $600 million above the president’s request. Advocates estimate this funding level is enough to renew all contracts with project owners.

Public Housing:

The bill provides the capital account with $2.775 billion, an increase of $25 million over the FY18 funding level to allow public housing agencies to better address lead-based paint hazards. This continued funding will enable housing agencies to make critical repairs, such as fixing leaky roofs and replacing outdated heating systems, to improve living conditions for tens of thousands of residents and help preserve this essential part of the nation’s affordable housing infrastructure for the future. The account also includes $30 million for emergency and disaster grants and $15 million for the Jobs-Plus pilot.

Funding for the public housing operating fund increased to $4.65 billion, up from $4.55 billion in FY18. The bill also provides a $5 million increase to the Family Self-Sufficiency program, which is funded at $80 million for FY19.

President Trump had proposed eliminating funding for the capital account and slashing funding for operating expenses in his FY19 budget.

Other Housing Programs:

The spending package provides $678 million to the Section 202 Housing for the Elderly program, the same level of funding as FY18. This funding will meet the renewal needs of the program. The bill also includes $10 million for new grants to allow low-income seniors to modify or repair their homes to help them age in place.

While the bill decreases funding for the Section 811 Housing for People with Disabilities program from FY18 levels by $46 million to $184 million ($30 million of which is to support new construction or project rental assistance), this amount is enough to renew all contracts. The FY18 spending bill provided $230 million for Section 811, $82.6 million of which was for new construction.

The spending package would level-fund the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program at $3.365 billion, but it would decrease the HOME Investments Partnerships program (HOME) from $1.36 billion in FY18 to $1.25 billion. Both programs would have been eliminated under the president’s budget request.

Funding for the Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) program was increased by $18 million to $393 million for FY19. The president proposed to fund HOPWA at $330 million.

Healthy Homes:

The spending package provides $279 million to the Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, $49 million more than the FY18 enacted level. The president would have funded the program at $145 million. From this allocation, $95 million is targeted to communities with the highest lead-based abatement needs. The bill also provides $64 million for the Lead Safe Communities Demonstration that will examine the effectiveness of multi-year investments in lead-based paint remediation activities in seven low-income communities.

The bill also takes steps to address the physical conditions of HUD-assisted housing to ensure residents are living in decent and safe homes. It requires HUD to act against property owners receiving rental subsidies who do not maintain safe properties. The language authorizes the HUD secretary to replace the property’s management agent with one approved by HUD, impose civil monetary penalties, change HUD’s contract with the property owner until the problem is resolved, transfer the property or contract to a new owner, and relocate tenants, among other actions.

Fair Housing:

The spending package flat-funds HUD’s office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity at $65 million.

The bill also prohibits HUD from directing local governments to change their zoning laws under the agency’s Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) rule or with the AFFH assessment tool, as was included in the FY18 and other past spending bills.

Calabria Confirmation Hearing Addresses HTF, Affordable Housing

The Senate Banking Committee held a confirmation hearing on February 14 with President Trump’s nominee to serve as director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), Dr. Mark Calabria.

Hours before the hearing, NLIHC President and CEO Diane Yentel and Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) President and CEO Maurice Jones published an op-ed in Affordable Housing Finance warning that the national Housing Trust Fund and Capital Magnet Fund – both of which are funded through a small assessment on Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac (government-sponsored entities or GSEs) – could be at risk under FHFA Acting Director Joseph Otting.

Democratic members of the Committee asked Dr. Calabria several questions about his past statements and writings on the cause of the financial crisis, his commitment to access and affordability, and the Trump administration’s plans to reform Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which the FHFA regulates.

In discussions with Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) and Jack Reed (D-RI), Dr. Calabria committed to continuing funding for the national Housing Trust Fund and Capital Magnet Fund as required by law. When asked if he would commit to continue funding for the Housing Trust Fund and the Capital Magnet Fund, Dr. Calabria said, “within the confines of the statute, absolutely yes.” When pressed by Senator Reed for more specificity, Dr. Calabria said that funding for the national Housing Trust Fund and Capital Magnet Fund would be suspended “only if the [GSEs] are essentially failing, and my primary responsibility, if confirmed as FHFA director, is to make sure that doesn’t happen.” He also stated that he had not seen any public information that would suggest that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were financially unstable.

When asked by Ranking Member Sherrod Brown (D-OH) about past support for eliminating the affordable housing goals at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, Dr. Calabria said he believes there is a balance between funding affordable housing goals and protecting taxpayers by having a robust capital buffer. He said he could “absolutely commit to keep them in place as long as the existing regulatory structure remains.” In response to a question by Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) about whether the FHFA director can unilaterally increase capital reserves, a move which could make homeownership loans unaffordable to many potential homebuyers, Calabria stated that the current Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement prevented such unilateral actions.

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) focused her questions on the role of the FHFA, through its affordable housing goals, in redressing the federal government’s long-established history of housing discrimination. Dr. Calabria committed to preserving strong affordable housing goals, but “in a sustainable way.” When Senator Tina Smith (D-MN) asked about the GSEs’ “Duty-to-Serve” requirements, which help facilitate affordable homes in rural and tribal areas, Dr. Calabria committed to continuing these efforts, but “not at the expense of the agencies’ safety and soundness”. He also spoke in favor of collecting data to track the effectiveness of these requirements.

Following are 116th Congress House and Senate Housing Members:

Members House Financial Services Subcommittee on Housing, Community Development and Insurance
Congressman William “Lacy” Clay (MO-1), Chair
Congresswoman Nydia M. Velázquez (NY-7)
Congressman Emanuel Cleaver (MO-5)
Congressman Brad Sherman (CA-30)
Congresswoman Joyce Beatty (OH-3)
Congressman Al Green (TX-9)
Congressman Vicente Gonzalez (TX-15)
Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney (NY-12)
Congressman Denny Heck (WA-10)
Congressman Juan Vargas (CA-51)
Congressman Al Lawson (FL-5)
Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib (MI-13)
Congresswoman Cindy Axne (IA-3)

Members Senate Committee On Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs

Majority Members:

Mike Crapo (R – ID)
Richard C. Shelby (R – AL)
Patrick J. Toomey (R – PA)
Tim Scott (R – SC)
Ben Sasse (R – NE)
Tom Cotton (R – AR)
Mike Rounds (R – SD)
David Perdue (R – GA)
Thom Tillis (R – NC)
John Kennedy (R – LA)
Martha McSally (R – AZ)
Jerry Moran (R – KS)
Kevin Cramer (R – ND)

Minority Members:

Sherrod Brown (D – OH)
Jack Reed
(D – RI)
Robert Menendez (D – NJ)
Jon Tester (D – MT)
Mark R. Warner (D – VA)
Elizabeth Warren (D – MA)
Brian Schatz (D – HI)
Chris Van Hollen (D – MD)
Catherine Cortez Masto (D – NV)
Doug Jones (D – AL)
Tina Smith (D – MN)
Kyrsten Sinema (D – AZ)

Senate Committee Approves Robust Funding for Affordable Housing in FY19

The Senate Appropriations Committee voted June 7 to approve a draft FY19 spending bill that provides robust funding for affordable housing and community development programs at HUD. The strong Senate bill is the direct result of the efforts by housing advocates across the nation and congressional champions Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) and Jack Reed (D-RI). The bill will now head to the Senate floor. See NLIHC’s updated budget chart.

Read more.

Disaster Relief for Housing Cooperatives

In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, our housing cooperatives realized that the common areas (hallways, roof, laundry rooms, etc.)  of their housing cooperatives, as well as condominiums and homeowners associations, were not eligible for FEMA Disaster Relief grants.  Only the inside of units are currently eligible for these grants.

To remedy this inequity, Congressman Mark Sanford (R-SC)  introduced HR 3238 on July 13, 2017. This bill would allow these homeowners to be eligible for FEMA grants for their common areas and thus treat them the same as all other homeowners.  Representatives Nadler (D-NY), Zeldin (R-NY), King (R-NY), and Engel (D-NY) are co-sponsors of HR 3238.

Attached is a letter of support for HR 3238 from the National Association of Housing Cooperatives and the Community Associations Institute.  To date, the National League of Cities, the National Cooperative Bank, the National Cooperative Business Association, and the National Leased Housing Association  have signed on to the letter.

We are hoping that others will consider adding their organization’s names in support of HR 3238. Please consider having your association and other organizations, including debris removal, sign on to our letter of support.

H.R.1684 – Disaster Assistance Support for Communities and Homeowners Act of 2017

H.R. 1684 was introduced by Representative Nadler (D-NY) on March 22, 2017. This legislation directs the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide assistance to housing cooperatives, condominiums and other homeowners associations, regarding the process to become eligible for disaster assistance.  In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, Rep. Nadler has been a strong supporter of efforts to obtain disaster assistance relief for our housing cooperatives. H.R. 1684 was assigned to the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management.

H.R.1684 – Disaster Assistance Support for Communities and Homeowners Act of 2017

 


Veterans Affairs (VA)

VA Loan Guarantees for Housing Cooperatives

Congressional action is needed to include housing cooperatives in the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) Home Mortgage Loan Guaranty program to allow veterans to use this VA benefit to purchase shares in a housing cooperative. Rep. Maloney (D-NY) has introduced bills in the past and plans to do so again this November. NAHC seeks support from veteran organizations as well as co-sponsors for this legislation. If you are a veteran, please help us gain support from veteran organizations. Everyone should ask their congressional representatives to consider co-sponsoring this VA legislative issue.

 

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Congressional Issues

Contact the United States Congress

Click here to view the list of Congressional Members by state.

*Identify Your Senators and Representatives in the U.S. Congress.
*Click the name of the elected official you want to contact. This will take you to their website.
*Look for the “Contact” link on the website, and click on it to find a web form to send your message. Send your message!

Let Your Cooperative Voice be heard by the Members of Congress that represent you!


Affordable Housing Programs Receive Increased Funding in Final FY19 Spending Deal (NLIHC)

Congress and the White House reached a final deal to fund the federal government for the remainder of FY19. In late December, President Trump and congressional leaders had failed to enact several spending bills for FY19 – including funding for affordable housing and community development programs – which led to the longest federal government shutdown in U.S. history. While leaders reached an agreement to reopen the government for three weeks, they were quickly approaching the new deadline of February 15 when congressional leaders finally reached a deal on a bipartisan spending package, including the Transportation-HUD and USDA spending bills that had previously been negotiated between the House and Senate. The Senate passed the spending package by a vote of 86-16 on February 14, and the House approved the measure on a 300-128 vote later that day. President Trump signed the bill into law on February 15.

Overall, the bill provides HUD programs with more than $12 billion above the president’s request. The spending package builds on the 10% increase in HUD funding that advocates and congressional champions secured in FY18 by providing $1.5 billion in new resources in FY19. In doing so, Congress has clearly rejected the calls to drastically cut housing investments in the form of funding cuts, harmful rent increases, rigid work requirements, or de facto time limits as proposed by the White House. For more details, see NLIHC’s updated budget chart.

Compared to FY18, the negotiated package increases funding for tenant-based rental assistance, public housing, project-based rental assistance, and homeless assistance grants. The bill also provides enough funding to renew all contracts for Section 811 Housing for Persons with Disabilities and Section 202 Housing for the Elderly. The HOME Investment Partnerships program received a slight reduction.

The spending package also includes $25 million for a mobility housing voucher demonstration for families with young children to help them move to areas of opportunity, and it provides $100 million in competitive grants to Native American communities to spur construction and preservation of affordable rental housing. The bill does not include an amendment introduced by former Senator Dean Heller (R-NV) that would have prohibited people charged with certain crimes from receiving housing assistance. NLIHC and other advocates voiced concerns about how this provision would have been implemented.

This successful outcome is due to the hard work of advocates across the nation and strong Congressional champions, including Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Jack Reed (D-RI) and Representatives David Price (D-NC) and Mario Diaz-Balart (R-FL) – the chairs and ranking members of the House and Senate Transportation-HUD Appropriations Subcommittees, as well as Senators Richard Shelby (R-AL) and Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and Representatives Nita Lowey (D-NY) and Kay Granger (R-TX) – the chairs and ranking members of the House and Senate Appropriations Committees.

Project-Based Rental Housing:

The spending package provides $11.747 billion to renew Project-Based Rental Assistance contracts for the remainder of the calendar year, an increase of $600 million above the president’s request. Advocates estimate this funding level is enough to renew all contracts with project owners.

Public Housing:

The bill provides the capital account with $2.775 billion, an increase of $25 million over the FY18 funding level to allow public housing agencies to better address lead-based paint hazards. This continued funding will enable housing agencies to make critical repairs, such as fixing leaky roofs and replacing outdated heating systems, to improve living conditions for tens of thousands of residents and help preserve this essential part of the nation’s affordable housing infrastructure for the future. The account also includes $30 million for emergency and disaster grants and $15 million for the Jobs-Plus pilot.

Funding for the public housing operating fund increased to $4.65 billion, up from $4.55 billion in FY18. The bill also provides a $5 million increase to the Family Self-Sufficiency program, which is funded at $80 million for FY19.

President Trump had proposed eliminating funding for the capital account and slashing funding for operating expenses in his FY19 budget.

Other Housing Programs:

The spending package provides $678 million to the Section 202 Housing for the Elderly program, the same level of funding as FY18. This funding will meet the renewal needs of the program. The bill also includes $10 million for new grants to allow low-income seniors to modify or repair their homes to help them age in place.

While the bill decreases funding for the Section 811 Housing for People with Disabilities program from FY18 levels by $46 million to $184 million ($30 million of which is to support new construction or project rental assistance), this amount is enough to renew all contracts. The FY18 spending bill provided $230 million for Section 811, $82.6 million of which was for new construction.

The spending package would level-fund the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program at $3.365 billion, but it would decrease the HOME Investments Partnerships program (HOME) from $1.36 billion in FY18 to $1.25 billion. Both programs would have been eliminated under the president’s budget request.

Funding for the Housing Opportunities for People with AIDS (HOPWA) program was increased by $18 million to $393 million for FY19. The president proposed to fund HOPWA at $330 million.

Healthy Homes:

The spending package provides $279 million to the Office of Lead Hazard Control and Healthy Homes, $49 million more than the FY18 enacted level. The president would have funded the program at $145 million. From this allocation, $95 million is targeted to communities with the highest lead-based abatement needs. The bill also provides $64 million for the Lead Safe Communities Demonstration that will examine the effectiveness of multi-year investments in lead-based paint remediation activities in seven low-income communities.

The bill also takes steps to address the physical conditions of HUD-assisted housing to ensure residents are living in decent and safe homes. It requires HUD to act against property owners receiving rental subsidies who do not maintain safe properties. The language authorizes the HUD secretary to replace the property’s management agent with one approved by HUD, impose civil monetary penalties, change HUD’s contract with the property owner until the problem is resolved, transfer the property or contract to a new owner, and relocate tenants, among other actions.

Fair Housing:

The spending package flat-funds HUD’s office of Fair Housing and Equal Opportunity at $65 million.

The bill also prohibits HUD from directing local governments to change their zoning laws under the agency’s Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) rule or with the AFFH assessment tool, as was included in the FY18 and other past spending bills.

Calabria Confirmation Hearing Addresses HTF, Affordable Housing

The Senate Banking Committee held a confirmation hearing on February 14 with President Trump’s nominee to serve as director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA), Dr. Mark Calabria.

Hours before the hearing, NLIHC President and CEO Diane Yentel and Local Initiatives Support Corporation (LISC) President and CEO Maurice Jones published an op-ed in Affordable Housing Finance warning that the national Housing Trust Fund and Capital Magnet Fund – both of which are funded through a small assessment on Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac (government-sponsored entities or GSEs) – could be at risk under FHFA Acting Director Joseph Otting.

Democratic members of the Committee asked Dr. Calabria several questions about his past statements and writings on the cause of the financial crisis, his commitment to access and affordability, and the Trump administration’s plans to reform Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which the FHFA regulates.

In discussions with Senator Chris Van Hollen (D-MD) and Jack Reed (D-RI), Dr. Calabria committed to continuing funding for the national Housing Trust Fund and Capital Magnet Fund as required by law. When asked if he would commit to continue funding for the Housing Trust Fund and the Capital Magnet Fund, Dr. Calabria said, “within the confines of the statute, absolutely yes.” When pressed by Senator Reed for more specificity, Dr. Calabria said that funding for the national Housing Trust Fund and Capital Magnet Fund would be suspended “only if the [GSEs] are essentially failing, and my primary responsibility, if confirmed as FHFA director, is to make sure that doesn’t happen.” He also stated that he had not seen any public information that would suggest that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were financially unstable.

When asked by Ranking Member Sherrod Brown (D-OH) about past support for eliminating the affordable housing goals at Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, Dr. Calabria said he believes there is a balance between funding affordable housing goals and protecting taxpayers by having a robust capital buffer. He said he could “absolutely commit to keep them in place as long as the existing regulatory structure remains.” In response to a question by Senator Mark Warner (D-VA) about whether the FHFA director can unilaterally increase capital reserves, a move which could make homeownership loans unaffordable to many potential homebuyers, Calabria stated that the current Preferred Stock Purchase Agreement prevented such unilateral actions.

Senator Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) focused her questions on the role of the FHFA, through its affordable housing goals, in redressing the federal government’s long-established history of housing discrimination. Dr. Calabria committed to preserving strong affordable housing goals, but “in a sustainable way.” When Senator Tina Smith (D-MN) asked about the GSEs’ “Duty-to-Serve” requirements, which help facilitate affordable homes in rural and tribal areas, Dr. Calabria committed to continuing these efforts, but “not at the expense of the agencies’ safety and soundness”. He also spoke in favor of collecting data to track the effectiveness of these requirements.

Following are 116th Congress House and Senate Housing Members:

Members House Financial Services Subcommittee on Housing, Community Development and Insurance
Congressman William “Lacy” Clay (MO-1), Chair
Congresswoman Nydia M. Velázquez (NY-7)
Congressman Emanuel Cleaver (MO-5)
Congressman Brad Sherman (CA-30)
Congresswoman Joyce Beatty (OH-3)
Congressman Al Green (TX-9)
Congressman Vicente Gonzalez (TX-15)
Congresswoman Carolyn B. Maloney (NY-12)
Congressman Denny Heck (WA-10)
Congressman Juan Vargas (CA-51)
Congressman Al Lawson (FL-5)
Congresswoman Rashida Tlaib (MI-13)
Congresswoman Cindy Axne (IA-3)

Members Senate Committee On Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs

Majority Members:

Mike Crapo (R – ID)
Richard C. Shelby (R – AL)
Patrick J. Toomey (R – PA)
Tim Scott (R – SC)
Ben Sasse (R – NE)
Tom Cotton (R – AR)
Mike Rounds (R – SD)
David Perdue (R – GA)
Thom Tillis (R – NC)
John Kennedy (R – LA)
Martha McSally (R – AZ)
Jerry Moran (R – KS)
Kevin Cramer (R – ND)

Minority Members:

Sherrod Brown (D – OH)
Jack Reed
(D – RI)
Robert Menendez (D – NJ)
Jon Tester (D – MT)
Mark R. Warner (D – VA)
Elizabeth Warren (D – MA)
Brian Schatz (D – HI)
Chris Van Hollen (D – MD)
Catherine Cortez Masto (D – NV)
Doug Jones (D – AL)
Tina Smith (D – MN)
Kyrsten Sinema (D – AZ)

Senate Committee Approves Robust Funding for Affordable Housing in FY19

The Senate Appropriations Committee voted June 7 to approve a draft FY19 spending bill that provides robust funding for affordable housing and community development programs at HUD. The strong Senate bill is the direct result of the efforts by housing advocates across the nation and congressional champions Senator Susan Collins (R-ME) and Jack Reed (D-RI). The bill will now head to the Senate floor. See NLIHC’s updated budget chart.

Read more.

Disaster Relief for Housing Cooperatives

In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, our housing cooperatives realized that the common areas (hallways, roof, laundry rooms, etc.)  of their housing cooperatives, as well as condominiums and homeowners associations, were not eligible for FEMA Disaster Relief grants.  Only the inside of units are currently eligible for these grants.

To remedy this inequity, Congressman Mark Sanford (R-SC)  introduced HR 3238 on July 13, 2017. This bill would allow these homeowners to be eligible for FEMA grants for their common areas and thus treat them the same as all other homeowners.  Representatives Nadler (D-NY), Zeldin (R-NY), King (R-NY), and Engel (D-NY) are co-sponsors of HR 3238.

Attached is a letter of support for HR 3238 from the National Association of Housing Cooperatives and the Community Associations Institute.  To date, the National League of Cities, the National Cooperative Bank, the National Cooperative Business Association, and the National Leased Housing Association  have signed on to the letter.

We are hoping that others will consider adding their organization’s names in support of HR 3238. Please consider having your association and other organizations, including debris removal, sign on to our letter of support.

H.R.1684 – Disaster Assistance Support for Communities and Homeowners Act of 2017

H.R. 1684 was introduced by Representative Nadler (D-NY) on March 22, 2017. This legislation directs the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to provide assistance to housing cooperatives, condominiums and other homeowners associations, regarding the process to become eligible for disaster assistance.  In the wake of Superstorm Sandy, Rep. Nadler has been a strong supporter of efforts to obtain disaster assistance relief for our housing cooperatives. H.R. 1684 was assigned to the House Transportation and Infrastructure Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management.

H.R.1684 – Disaster Assistance Support for Communities and Homeowners Act of 2017

 


Veterans Affairs (VA)

VA Loan Guarantees for Housing Cooperatives

Congressional action is needed to include housing cooperatives in the Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) Home Mortgage Loan Guaranty program to allow veterans to use this VA benefit to purchase shares in a housing cooperative. Rep. Maloney (D-NY) has introduced bills in the past and plans to do so again this November. NAHC seeks support from veteran organizations as well as co-sponsors for this legislation. If you are a veteran, please help us gain support from veteran organizations. Everyone should ask their congressional representatives to consider co-sponsoring this VA legislative issue.